The Human Dog Pound

When I look out of my cell, I see other inmates standing in the door looking out their window. We look like animals in the pound waiting for someone to take us home. When we hear keys we stand at the door. “Come get me, come get me” is the way the faces look in the door. Continue reading

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‘Now I’m going through the same thing in Hillsborough’

Hello, how are you? Not sure who I’m writing by name, but I’m familiar with your work and organization. Y’all used to send me newsletters and stuff during my 22 and a half month stay in Durham County Jail from May 2012 to March 2014. I sat in there through lockbacks and all for a charge that was dismissed that I did not have anything to do with which I believe the police knew from the start. Continue reading

Thoughts from a rebel: Crime and its effects

Friday, July 1, 2016 2:35 a.m.

Take a look through a different point of view, with a glimpse into the frame of mind, and maybe the masses will have a better understanding on how, why, who and where crime is committed and thus individuals are incarcerated.

Being amongst those born under-privileged and currently incarcerated for allegedly committing a crime, I feel as if I can inform you on this subject best.

You see, for most individuals crime isn’t a mental issue, crime is more of an economic  issue (but as always, there are those rare cases where crime is a mental issue and the criminal was justly detained and treated.) You see, most of the people who commit crime are doing so because of their lack of funds to survive, or also they’re surviving on the basic tip, but they’re not on the social level. Continue reading

‘I’m a black male–that’s why I’m still here.’

Hello feedback world,

I have been housed here in the Durham County Jail since April 8, 2016. After checking my house on the night in question, the Durham police left with nothing. But they came back a week later cause the word of a white woman. Yes, I’m a black male, that’s why I’m still here. Thanking God for the change in my life. I’ve been out the system for eight long years. Continue reading

‘It’s hard to give respect when they treat you like wild mules!’

Hello, Peace and Love!

I’m TyQuan MacCutcheon, this letter is deep and means a lot to me…I’ve only been in here for a month and would love to give you feed back. I was taught to get respect is to give respect! Well, it’s very hard to give respect to a c.o., when they look and treat you like wild mules! Like we are a stray pitbull or a gorilla that’s gone wild! It’s sad, yes, we are humans that make mistakes, but it doesn’t give c.o.’s the right to treat us wrong! I’m 23 years old with a five million dollar bond! Hold on! Let me repeat that! I’m 23 years old with a 5 million dollar bond! I haven’t killed nobody! Hold on! Let me repeat that! I HAVEN’T KILLED NOBODY! My bond is 5 million dollars as if i’m El Chapo or Bin Laden. It’s sickening…I’m from Hampton, VA. Durham County is a rip off! From Aramark food to the nurses and also the magistrate! Something has got to change! I’ll be proud when I go home and come back to protest against Durham County Jail! Hampton City Jail is way better than this hell hole!! I am a comrade and am willing to whatever it takes to change this place around! Continue reading

‘What’s wrong with that picture?’

I’m doing good, thanks for asking. I’m really glad you all have reached out to me. To tell you a little about myself. My name is Niajel Slad, 24, and I been in the Durham Co. Jail since Aug. 26, 2015. Mind you, when I found out I was a suspect, I turned myself in. Even though the lack of evidence, my bond is 3 million. The media and police said a lot of inaccurate things about me. They treat me like a monster. Continue reading

‘Something gotta give’

Thursday 6/9/16

Hey —

What’s going on? How are you doing? Fine I hope and all is good and well with you and IOA family and supporters. As for myself, I’m okay, I guess being that I’m still breathing. I want to apologize for not responding to your letters sooner, but I’ve been going through some things. Things that probably 95%, if not 100% of us Durham County Jail Detainees are going through that involves the court system. Things like:

  1. Being held under outrageous bonds (ransoms).
  2.  Not hearing/seeing attorneys for months at a time.
  3. Being held for bogus charges (He say/she say/word of mouth).

Continue reading